The Good Book | Hits & Misses | Salt Lake City Weekly

The Good Book 

Take Shelter, Surf's Up!

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The Good Book
Try telling this to the women of today: "I do not permit a woman to teach or to have authority over a man; she must be silent." Let's just say it likely won't go well. The Southern Baptist Convention, however, took 1 Timothy 2:12 pretty darned literally and banned women from the pulpits of its churches. So just how literally should you take a book—even if it's considered to be a holy book? Frankly, we'd still be stoning women and subjugating slaves to cruel treatment if we did. Oh, and be careful about cursing your parents—you could be put to death. But in the fervor to save "the foundational document for Western civilization," Rep. Ken Ivory, R-West Jordan, brought the Bible back onto school library shelves. Never mind how many people take exception to the Bible being so foundational. Although Ivory gets it partly right, saying the Bible relates both "good and bad matters of history," he doesn't think it appeals to prurient interests. But maybe he hasn't really read it.

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Take Shelter
If you believe that housing is a big part of helping the homeless, then you'll probably like what two nonprofits have been doing. The Family Support Center and HomeAid Utah helped with the renovation and remodel of several units in LifeStart Village, a transitional housing program for single parents with children, according to KSL. They offer programs and financial assistance—as well as a roof over heads. Homelessness is far from an easy problem to solve, but the state's Homelessness Council and Office of Homeless Service are moving toward increasing the amount of permanent affordable housing units as well as providing services for those in need, Axios reports. While there is no perfect solution, at least there's a plan in the works, thanks to state homeless coordinator, Wayne Niederhauser. It needs to be sooner than later, as homelessness has increased over the years.

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Surf's Up!
Air and water—the two elements that could save or destroy Utah as a livable state. A recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling may have put wetlands at risk by limiting the Clean Water Act. To be protected, those wetlands must have a "continuous surface connection" to any larger body of water, the court said. That the water in question is for the struggling Navajo Nation makes the ruling even more disastrous. Meanwhile, Lake Powell has been drying up, and if the number of extreme heat days doubles by 2050, Utah could be seeing wildfires and experiencing drought from which it cannot recover, KUER 90.1FM reports. Conservation still is the solution du jour. A letter to The Salt Lake Tribune expressed dismay at plans for a private surf community in southern Utah, even while "the average resident is being asked to rid their property of grass and conserve water." But in keeping with the Utah Way, businesses and rich people usually get what they want, even if it's at the expense of a water-starved public.

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About The Author

Katharine Biele

Katharine Biele

Bio:
A City Weekly contributor since 1992, Katharine Biele is the informed voice behind our Hits & Misses column. When not writing, you can catch her working to empower voters and defend democracy alongside the League of Women Voters.

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