Navajo Bingo No-Go | Cover Story | Salt Lake City | Salt Lake City Weekly

Navajo Bingo No-Go 

Even Utah’s Indian reservations aren’t immune to Utah’s gambling laws.

Pin It
Favorite

In 1987, the Court ruled in California v. Cabazon Band of Mission Indians that, as sovereign political entities, American Indian tribes may operate gaming facilities free of state regulation. In response, the states, wanting to tax American Indian gaming revenues, lobbied federal government to allow regulation, leading Congress to pass the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act in 1988. The act states tribes can operate gaming facilities on reservation land provided the state already allows some form of gaming.

Now, well over 200 of the 562 tribes in the United States operate casinos, which produce billions of dollars and employ many tribal members, thus improving the quality of life on those reservations. But, since gaming is illegal in Utah, our tribes are out of luck.

“It’s really sad,” says Kenneth Maryboy, San Juan County Commissioner and Navajo Nation Councilman. It’s a real struggle for the Utah Navajos, because we’re sort of like a stepchild to both sides of the government.” He says the Navajo Nation, headquartered in Window Rock, Ariz., “doesn’t want a whole lot to do with us as Utah Navajos,” although Utah Navajos' oil revenues inject about $250,000 into the Nation’s coffers.

Meanwhile, since November 2008, the Navajo Nation has enjoyed revenues generated by its first gaming facility, Fire Rock Navajo Casino in Gallup, N.M. Nation President Joe Shirley told the Gallup Independent that within five months, Fire Rock was the most successful Indian casino in the state, and announced plans for three more. “It’s really hard [to watch],” says Maryboy, “for those of us trying to make it into the economic mainstream.”

Maryboy says Utah Navajos are pursuing a class II gaming facility—a bingo hall—at Montezuma Creek near the Four Corners area, but so far, state government balks at the plan. “The legal opinion is that Utah is a non-gaming state, therefore, they can’t show anyone special treatment; they have to abide by the law. If that’s the case, then why are there bingo establishments in Salt Lake City? What makes that different?

“So, it’s quite sad … but that doesn’t mean that we’re gonna [give up]," Maryboy says. We’re very eager to develop and further this endeavor. The Utah Navajo don’t want to depend on the government. We want to be self-sufficient.”

Pin It
Favorite

Speaking of , Gallup Independen,

  • Utah’s Bright and Shining Future

    SLC youth join thousands of students from around the world to demand action on climate change.
    • Mar 15, 2019
  • This Is the End, My Friend

    Conversion therapy! Fornication! Slavery! A venomous lizard not native to our state! 2019 Legislature reaches feverish conclusion.
    • Mar 15, 2019
  • Thrilla from Manila

    BFF Turon serves up a tasty masterclass in Filipino cuisine.
    • Mar 13, 2019
  • More »

More by Randy Harward

  • Live Music Picks: April 19-25

    MC Chris, Talia Keys & the Love, Nick Passey, Brian Wilson and more.
    • Apr 18, 2018
  • Rock-It Fuel

    Local musicians dish on the grub that puts the bomp in their bomp-bah-bomp-bah-bomp.
    • Apr 11, 2018
  • Live Music Picks: April 12-18

    Judas Priest, The Residents, Clownvis Presley, The Breeders and more.
    • Apr 11, 2018
  • More »

Latest in Cover Story

  • Local Music Issue 2019

    Turn it up to 11, boys and girls. Our rockingest issue is here!
    • Mar 12, 2019
  • Spread Thin

    Soon, the biologically rich Pando Forest could be a thing of the past.
    • Mar 6, 2019
  • The Unsinkable Shireen Ghorbani

    After two electoral defeats, the Salt Lake County Democrat finally gets her turn.
    • Feb 27, 2019
  • More »

Comments (8)

Showing 1-8 of 8

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-8 of 8

Add a comment

Readers also liked…

  • Satanists Are People, Too

    Shake hands with your devil-loving neighbor.
    • Oct 18, 2017
  • Team Wolf

    Science shows killing the beasts does more harm than good.
    • Jan 3, 2018

© 2019 Salt Lake City Weekly

Website powered by Foundation