May 2024 Music Spotlight | Music | Salt Lake City Weekly

May 2024 Music Spotlight 

New music and older favorites including Mel Soul, Caleb Darger, Dirt Nappers, City Ghost

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Caleb Darger - LAURA LEE IMAGES
  • Laura Lee Images
  • Caleb Darger

Luckily, the music news in the local scene never stops. There are always new releases from your favorite bands, and plenty to discover from bands you don't know yet. If you're anything like me, you love to have a playlist for every occasion and mood. Here's a good mix of older and new releases that are perfect for your library.

Mel Soul & The Heartbeat, "I Am Now" music video: SLC songstress Mel Soul is back with a delightful new music video for her song "I Am Now." While this isn't good news for your playlists, it's great news for your viewing pleasure. In the video, Mel Soul is on stage with her bandmates at the International, as fans are smiling and vibing with the excellent tunes. The song is upbeat and cheerful, which is reflected in the video itself. The lyrics are also very empowering, all about living in the now and taking control of your life. Add the song to your playlists if you need a little boost, and check out the video if you want to see people having a great time together.
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Caleb Darger, "Quanah": "I wrote [this song] several years ago after spending time at Standing Rock during the protests there in 2016," Darger said of his new single. "I wrote it about the destruction of the environment by the oil industry, specifically the destruction of Indigenous lands. It's a little different vibe from my other songs, so I didn't have a project to release it under until recently, when I decided it fits well enough with the songs on my upcoming album." "Quanah" is a deeply contemplative and beautiful song that envelops you in its sound. It's atmospheric and gentle, but delivers an impact with its statement about Indigenous lands, as Darger mentioned above. This is a great track for when you're in a mellow mood and you want a song that will speak to your soul.
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The Dirt Nappers, Pushing Up Daisies: Rock trio The Dirt Nappers pack a punch with their sound—and their latest album, Pushing Up Daisies, is a shining example of those punchy qualities. Father/son duo Jeff and Cole Goodwin bring a southern tinge to the sound, creating a listening experience that you don't want to miss out on. Joined by drummer Brad Clark, the group creates an exciting soundscape that keeps you coming back for more. If you're a fan of rock and blues, you'll want to give this new album a listen ASAP. The Dirt Nappers sound fresh, but have nostalgic qualities to them; you're hearing them in 2024, but you could have also heard them in previous decades, and they would fit right in. Rock and blues have that timeless quality. You can find Pushing Up Daisies on Bandcamp or YouTube.
Bandcamp
Youtube

City Ghost, "Good News": If you're in the mood for some dreamy, ethereal indie rock, you'll want to add City Ghost's latest single "Good News" to your library. "Good News" is equal parts anthemic and noisy—noisy in the best way possible. You're completely surrounded by pounding drums and persistent guitar that serve up a distinctive energy. This song released last summer, and City Ghost has been a bit quiet since last fall, but hopefully they're doing well and will return soon with more fantastic tracks like "Good News."
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Bliss Peak, The Grand Machine: Bliss Peak's latest album The Grand Machine, seems like it is itself a grand machine, with an impressive 15-track length and considerable play time. Many of the songs pass the four-minute mark, yet you never feel bored or tired while listening through. Each track holds similarities to one another, but new elements are introduced as the album continues, keeping you wondering what will pop up next. Bliss Peak is the brainchild of local singer/songwriter/producer JaCoby Newton (cleverly dubbed @obiwan_jacoby on Instagram, shout out to all the Star Wars fans), with The Grand Machine being the latest project. It's a great album to get lost in if you need to space out for a bit and think about other things. Not to say that this album is boring and will make you space out, but it has a comforting feel that'll make you feel less lonely and part of something bigger. Like a grand machine, perhaps.
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Sinking About, Church of Jupiter: I've never felt compelled to join a church, but the Church of Jupiter is one I'd join. Sinking About's latest release is a three-track EP including the title track—and these are songs that haven't left my head since I listened to them. The band hasn't stopped thinking about them, either, saying they're "Sinking about churches on Jupiter," on their Instagram. Yeah, a good pun is always welcome. The indie group creates a world all their own, especially with "Church of Jupiter." It has it all: persistent synths, chugging drums and dreamy vocals that will have you slowly ascending to that extraterrestrial house of worship. Add this to your playlists when you're feeling excited and happy, and you want to show loved ones a good time.
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This is just a small taste of the local scene, so follow your favorite artists to stay up to date on their latest releases and quality content for your playlists.

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About The Author

Emilee Atkinson

Emilee Atkinson

Bio:
Ogden native Emilee Atkinson has spent her life obsessing over music and enjoying writing. Eventually, she decided to combine the two. She’s the current music editor of City Weekly.

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