LDS Liquor Bullies, MediaOne Ad Rejects & Rep. Holdaway Resigns | Hits & Misses | Salt Lake City | Salt Lake City Weekly

LDS Liquor Bullies, MediaOne Ad Rejects & Rep. Holdaway Resigns 

Pin It
Favorite

sad.jpg
Liquor Bullies
Even during a winter freeze in Logan, there are many places that offer adult beverages within a bearable walking distance of the LDS Tabernacle. That’s because the Tabernacle is the centerpiece of Logan’s downtown district, where people come to shop, study, eat, go to a movie or get a drink. Yet, for some reason, the LDS Church, who did not return calls for comment, has decided to refuse to grant a waiver for a liquor license to the owners of the new Iron Gate Grill, which will be less than 600 feet from the tabernacle—if a person jaywalks. The grill will be next door to a bar and across the street from a Italian restaurant and a coffee shop, and if it were to be granted a waiver, it would join the many other restaurants that have previously been granted a waiver by the LDS Church. Finally, city leaders and the business community support the grill owners, who already operate their original Iron Gate Grill in nearby Providence. Yet it is all for naught unless the LDS Church, which essentially has veto power over state liquor commissioners, acquiesces.

smiley.jpg
Jumping MediaOne
Want free advertising in this state? Develop an ad that crosses the sensitivity line for the Deseret News, get it rejected by MediaOne, the business arm of the News and The Salt Lake Tribune, and then tell everyone about it. Voila! Free advertising.. That’s exactly what a group holding a memorial for gay Mormons who had committed suicide did, and it worked. Whether they intended to have the ad quashed by the Mormon-owned newspaper is irrelevant, because their rejected ad likely received a lot more attention last week than if it had actually run and, more importantly, they got to talk about their event in news stories. And it was all done without costing the group a penny.

sad.jpg
Conveniently Ethical
Rep. Kory Holdaway, R-Taylorsville, a legislator who often leads the fight for education, will become the top lobbyist for the Utah Education Association next month. Thankfully, he will resign his seat—which is not actually required just because he is a lobbyist—but he will be using the connections and influence he built while serving (and being paid by) the public. Even more disappointingly, UEA is one of the primary supporters of the so-called ethics-reform initiative that would require former legislators to wait two years before becoming lobbyists.

Pin It
Favorite

Speaking of...

About The Author

Josh Loftin

Bio:
Josh Loftin: Twitter | Facebook | News Blog

More by Josh Loftin

Latest in Hits & Misses

  • Libertarian Utah

    Utahns make it known how they feel about taxes, the good and bad from San Juan County, and another setback for the Cottonwood Mall site.
    • Nov 14, 2018
  • Too Little, Too Much

    The state revisits its sex-ed guidelines, the benefits of having two daily newspapers and a former mayor takes up a new fight.
    • Nov 7, 2018
  • High Times

    A Utah senator tried marijuana, but what was the message? A win for Utahns' health and an unfortunate consequence of Medicare.
    • Oct 31, 2018
  • More »

Comments

Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

Readers also liked…

  • High Anxiety

    A new study suggests link between altitude and high teen suicide rates, coal is still king in Utah, for now, and an unhappy former mayor.
    • Jul 4, 2018
  • Dear Jon

    A letter to Jon Huntsman Jr., more kids means fewer taxes in Utah and some perspective on the inland port debate.
    • Jul 25, 2018

© 2018 Salt Lake City Weekly

Website powered by Foundation