Breathe It In | Hits & Misses | Salt Lake City | Salt Lake City Weekly

Breathe It In 

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Breathe It In
If you haven't heard it enough, here's the monotonous excuse again: According to the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, industry contributes to only 11 percent of our pollution. So, hands off. It makes you wonder if the people who own these refineries actually breathe. In the case of Andeavor (formerly Tesoro), it looks like they do. You might remember one of @realdonaldtrump's photo ops at Andeavor's North Dakota refinery where he bravely said he was ready to snuff out environmental protections, you know, for jobs, jobs, jobs. "Andeavor says they're still committed to their efforts to reduce pollution and protect wildlife," a story in West Dakota Fox News said. Now, from Breathe Utah, we find that Andeavor installed a wet-gas scrubber, resulting in a 94 percent reduction in its emissions—because jobs are no good if you don't have healthy workers.

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Hold Your Horses
Rep. Chris Stewart grew up on an Idaho farm. So, of course, he knows about wild horses and what should be done to save them. On Christmas Day, The New York Times ran his op-ed advocating slaughter. Humanely, of course, but killing healthy animals, nonetheless. We get that the wild horse problem is not an easy one to solve. They are having way too much unprotected sex and producing too many foals, and sadly, many of them are starving to death. That, however, is partly a range management problem, according to a National Geographic article, which calls the BLM out for its dysfunctionality. The problem also is due to a lack of predators and the federal government's emphasis on livestock. Birth control helps keep the wild horse population down, but that effort is anemic. Well, the whole thing's complicated, and Stewart would be wise to recognize that it could take a multi-pronged approach—and money. And compassion.

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Land-User Error
Brighton residents just feel disrespected. They remember a time when they felt like a city—when they had a bowling alley and an ice skating rink. You know, that's city life. But now, according to The Salt Lake Tribune, they feel like the poor stepchild of Salt Lake City and County. It seems that the ski resorts have more input into decision-making than the hapless residents. When the county formed the Mountainous Planning District a few years ago, it was to solve some of those land-use problems, though cities couldn't belong. But it hasn't worked out to the satisfaction of residents, who, among other things, have been crying about the lack of toilets and what that means. All this and a lack of influence means they have nowhere to go. Literally.

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