A for Effort | Hits & Misses | Salt Lake City | Salt Lake City Weekly

A for Effort 

A lesson in peaceful protests. Weigh in on our canyons' future. Plus, what's going on with San Juan County?

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A for Effort
Some Utah parents get an A for effort for respectfully teaching their kids about the First Amendment. This little effort led by Cherise Udell of Utah Moms for Clean Air used colored chalk to draw art and messages protesting Geneva Rock's gravel pit expansion in Lehi. They're unhappy, according to Fox13 News, about the operation's effect on air quality and the city's insensitivity to its residents' health. For this, Lehi police came out to threaten charges of criminal mischief and city officials claimed that taxpayer dollars must be used because the chalk defaced walkways outside city hall. Udell says the rain would take care of it, and has since joined the ACLU in filing a complaint against the city. This is hardly a case of malicious graffiti, but the city seems to think these children need to learn their place.

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The Cost of Success
If you've been up the canyons lately to ski, hike or sightsee, you know you could spend hours in traffic and might even be turned back for lack of parking. Little Cottonwood Canyon alone sees 1.2 million trips a year. This is the cost of success and it's a bummer for residents. The trick will be to create a solution that not only helps recreationists and residents of the canyons, but also considers the environmental effects. Officials are seeking public input on two related studies, according to The Salt Lake Tribune. The Little Cottonwood Canyon Environmental Impact Statement and the Cottonwood Canyons Transportation Plan roll out a number of scenarios, including toll roads, buses and even an additional road lane, which sounds like a lot of work. Make your voice heard at bit.ly/2uQuB95.

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San Juan Conspiracy?
OK, have you heard of the blog The Petroglyph? I hadn't until recent articles sparked the wild interest of conspiracy theorists. And frankly, everything that goes on in San Juan County lately smacks of conspiracy, although whose conspiracy is the question. First, consider the many GRAMA requests flooding the county. One asked for a memo from Steven Boos' law firm to Commissioner Willie Grayeyes. This has to do with a "conspiracy" against the San Juan County prosecutor. Meanwhile, a Petroglyph opinion piece questioned whether it was against the law to say a prayer in Navajo, you know, because English is spoken here—or there. And of course, there's always Rep. Phil Lyman, R-Blanding who wants the county split, as if it isn't already. San Juan's politics are anything but normal and are already immersed in racist overtones and costly, if questionable, strategies. It's not likely to end soon.

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