Splash Time | Urban Living
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Wednesday, June 30, 2021

Splash Time

Posted By on June 30, 2021, 4:00 AM

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If you haven't been acting like a lizard and hiding under a rock in the shade during this unwelcomed heat, just think: Summer has only begun in Utah! Our governor has asked us to pray for rain (for reals) and to conserve energy and water. He could go further and enforce conservation rules now rather than when we're down to our last drops—such as asking restaurants to serve water only when patrons request it, requiring decorative fountains to be shut down if they aren't recycling the water, requiring golf courses to closely monitor their water usage and enforcing limits on watering lawns and agricultural crops.

There are splash pads everywhere designed to recycle the water and provide fun for kids: The Gateway's Olympic Legacy Plaza Snowflake fountain shoots water from the ground into the air, as does St. George's Town Square Park fountain. The Oquirrh Shadows Park Splash Pad in South Jordan is a favorite play area that's also free. The Desert Wave public pool at 250 E. 500 North in Price has the WIBIT indoor pool obstacle course as well as large outdoor pools for all ages, and Lagoon in Farmington has plenty of swim and water play options. The Bellagio-like musical fountain at Station Park in Farmington is not a place to swim but certainly gives you a cool feeling to watch when you're hot.

One of the more popular parks in Utah is Cowabunga Bay in Draper, which reminds me of a ginormous Mouse Trap game, only with water rushing along its water slides. They offer beaches, pools, splashes and rivers—even cabanas to rent for more of a VIP experience around a private pool. Driving by on Interstate 15, you can see the huge yellow water bucket dump 1,200 gallons of water onto patrons standing below it.

The oldest operating water park is Cherry Hill in Kaysville. There's a reason they have sold out their season passes for 2021: this resort not only has pools, a lazy river and water slides but a campground and mini golf—something for everyone to enjoy.

Seven Peaks waterpark in Provo is now Splash Summit Waterpark, offering15 different attractions for swimmers and kids. It's Utah's largest waterpark, and they have just spent a ton of money on what is called the Rainforest River. "Guests will float around this new masterpiece enjoying the sights, sounds and smells of the rainforest," says owner, Spencer Shumway. Also in Utah County is the smaller Spanish Fork Water Park at 199 N. 300 West.

Not everyone knows there is a splash zone at Hogle Zoo, which helps when you're roaming around the grounds in triple-digit heat wishing you had a way for the kids to cool off. It's got a cute shipwreck/pirate theme and an added tide pool full of starfish and other creatures.

About The Author

Babs Delay

Babs Delay

Bio:
De Lay is realtor/broker/owner of Urban Utah Homes and Estates. She is a former member of the Utah Transit Authority's Board of Trustees.

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