Music Picks May 1-7 | Live: The Swell Season, Do It!, Northern State, Elbow, Harptallica 

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Thursday 5.1
Jackie Campbell (Solid Ground Cafe); The Used (Great Saltair); Reverend Deadeye (Urban Lounge)

Friday 5.2
When the John Carney-directed film Once debuted at Sundance in 2007, lead actor Glen Hansard graciously accepted the surrounding buzz as nice—but fleeting. “I’m going to focus on me band [Irish rockers The Frames] for the next couple of years,” he said. “And the film, I really wish it all the best. I wish John all the best, but I’m happy to leave it in the past.” The public, however, couldn’t allow Hansard and his co-star/collaborator Marketa Irglova to sideline their work as The Swell Season, their musical project whose contribution to Once garnered them an Oscar this year for Best Original Song. “Falling Slowly”—a wrenching ballad that builds and builds, then explodes before returning to melancholy—is just one example of the beautiful and unpretentious magic audience members can expect from tonight’s performance. The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 8 p.m. Tickets:

Also Friday: Dark Meat (Kilby Court—Read Article); Cut Copy, Black Kids (Urban Lounge—Read Article); Kaskade, DJ Juggy (The Hotel); Devil Doll (Bar Deluxe)

Saturday 5.3
Anyone out there recognize Quanstar? The Compton-born emcee dedicated his life to hip-hop—that, and raising his son as a single dad—but he’s still hardly a household name. Sadly, his story is all too familiar: promising artist works overtime to “make it,” only to realize the secret to success is a trick question. In Do It! A Documentary, Quanstar offers viewers a nice reality check without veering into doomsday territory. Nitty-gritty footage follows the artist recording in a basement practice space and cramped studio, on tour, in hotel rooms with family and friends. The film itself could benefit from some serious editing, but the shaky camera work and muffled testimonies are endearing—especially to other artists trying to make a dollar out of 15 cents. Uprok, 342 S. State, 8 p.m. Info: 363-1523

In the beginning, there were Beastie Boys—and it was good. All good. Beastie Boys begot Luscious Jackson, with original Boy, Kate Schellenbach, pounding skins for the all-female down-tempo soul/punk group. Nearly 10 years after LJ’s demise, fans of the band’s mellow groove and socially conscious vibe looked to Northern State for a new generation of dope, slightly bratty rhymes on the feminist tip. Coming full circle, the Long Island hip-hop trio’s third release Can I Keep This Pen? (Ipecac) features production by—who else?—AdRock. Hear that beat … drop? Pen is smart and rough, with equal parts political commentary and sexual innuendo you can bounce to. Northern State even covered “No Surprises” for Stereogum’s coveted tribute to Radiohead’s OK Computer, so tell your hipster friends and grab your older sister’s classic A.D.I.D.A.S. This is some original, new old-school shit. Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 7:30 p.m. All-ages. (with Rope or Bullets)

On Elbow’s last LP, singer Guy Garvey observed “The leaders of the free world are just little boys throwing stones.” With the Manchester band’s 2008 release Seldom Seen Kid, Garvey turns the scrutiny inward: “There’s a hole in my neighborhood down which of late I cannot help but fall,” a line typical of the new album’s many ruminations on love, dead ends and Catholic guilt. Elbow’s songwriting chops are impressive, but Garvey could sing about his grocery list and it would still drive you to drink—and, perhaps, drive you to count your blessings. His alternately husky and porcelain voice slips through the rhythm section’s brilliant marriage of symphonic and barroom instrumentation with poignant grace. Elbow sounds like working class highs and lows; taking life as it comes with no fuss. No blinking. The Depot, 400 S. West Temple, 8 p.m. Tickets:

Also Saturday: NOFX (In the Venue); With Dead Hands Rising (Outer Rim); The New Frontiers (Solid Ground Cafe); The Buckle Busters (Westminster College); The Hostile Amish (Burt’s Tiki Lounge); Voodoo Darlings Burlesque (The Woodshed)

Sunday 5.4
Harptallica plays metal hits, but the classically trained duo’s talents might benefit from slightly more, um, refined surroundings. Ashley Toman and Patricia Kline cut their teeth in the hallowed space of New York’s Eastman School of Music. They mastered the harp, then pursued the challenge of adapting guitar-based metal compositions to their unruly 12-string instrument of choice. Songs that best lend themselves to interpretation—“The Unforgiven” and “Enter Sandman”—are suitable for raising devils horns. Other selections might lull listeners into an evening nap—especially after a few pints. While not an agent of kick-out-the-jams catharsis, Harptallica certainly fulfills the urge to watch expert artisans navigate foreign territory with relative ease. Salt Lake City Black Sabbath cover band Irony Man will provide the rawk. Burt’s Tiki Lounge, 726 S. State, 10 p.m. Tickets:

Also Sunday: Lorene Drive (Avalon); Prize Country (Broken Record)

Monday 5.5
Destroy the Runner (Avalon); Dusty Rhodes & The River Band (Urban Lounge)

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Tuesday 5.6
The Cops, Elizabethan Report (Kilby Court); VHS or Beta (Urban Lounge); Pennywise, Strung Out (Great Saltair); Victor Wooten (The Paladium—
see Essentials)

Wednesday 5.7
Efterklang, Slaraffenland (Urban Lounge); The Mosh Lives Tour (Outer Rim)

Coming Up
Eisley (Avalon, May 8); Yo Majesty, Does It Offend You, Yeah? (Urban Lounge, May 9); Cary Judd, Larry Bagby (Velour, May 9); Ra Ra Riot, Little Ones (Kilby Court, May 10); Boss Martians (Urban Lounge, May 11); Rosewood Thieves, Calico (Bar Deluxe, May 12); Subtle (Urban Lounge, May 12); Voodoo Organist (Burt’s Tiki Lounge, May 13); Dead Meadow, The Furs (Kilby Court, May 15); Tapes N Tapes, White Denim (In the Venue, May 16); M.I.A. (The Depot, May 18)

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