Lo and Behold, Reveries of the Connected World | Salt Lake City Weekly
Pin It
Favorite

 

  Rated PG-13 · 98 minutes · 2016
Once again, Werner Herzog finds fascinating documentary subjects to which he can apply his plummy Teutonic-toned narration; this time around, he dives into a variety of subjects related to our now-perpetually-online world. Navigating his way from the birth of the Internet through topics ranging from cyber-bullying to online addiction to the threat of solar flares wiping out connectivity, Herzog drops a few gems the way only he can: describing the UCLA basement where the primitive ARPANET was formed with “the corridors here look repulsive;” expressing fascination with one gamer’s character of a “malevolent druid dwarf.” It’s all quite episodic, with some of Herzog’s interview subjects considerably more interesting than others, and perhaps he circles around too obviously to the loss of human contact endemic to modern society. But who else would know just how long to hold the bizarre image of one troubled family behind a table full of muffins, or give the same topic of cyber-warfare threats that drives Zero Days a much more intriguing human face? Life in the 21st century may be strange indeed, but Herzog is willing to find it both beautiful and repulsive.
Staff Rating:
Official Site: www.loandbeholdfilm.com
Director: Werner Herzog
Producer: Rupert Maconick, Werner Herzog, Jim McNiel, Dave Arnold, Tennille Teague and David Moore

Now Playing

Sorry there are no upcoming showtimes for Lo and Behold, Reveries of the Connected World

Reviews/comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a review


Roll over stars and click to rate.

What others are saying (3)

Boise Weekly Lo and Behold: Werner in the World Is Herzog Taking Us Now? “Look into the eyes of a chicken, and you’ll see real stupidity." by George Prentice 08/24/2016
Gambit Review: Lo and Behold, Reveries of the Connected World Werner Herzog exposes the iheart of darkness by Ken Korman 08/29/2016
Charleston City Paper Werner Herzog mines the net for a documentary look at the future In 10 micro chapters, Werner Herzog, the director of the classic odysseys Fitzcarraldo (1982) and Aquirre, the Wrath of God (1972), tackles the internet, its rise, and the perils and promise of a connected world. The scope and the questions are nothing new — "Who is going to be liable if a computer makes a mistake?" by Tom Meek 08/31/2016

© 2017 Salt Lake City Weekly

Website powered by Foundation