LIVE: Music Picks Sept. 29-Oct. 5 

Colt .46, Dinosaur Jr., Neil Young, and more

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People Power Punk Rock: SDS Fundraiser w/ All Systems Fail, Bancho, Cady Heron, Sympathy Pain, Hylian

If you know your '60s American history, you're probably familiar with Students for a Democratic Society, the left-wing student activist group that organized protests against the war in Vietnam, and championed other progressive causes. The original SDS folded in 1969, but 10 years ago, a new group took up the banner, and the University of Utah branch is holding a fundraiser. Appropriately enough, the theme is punk rock, but the bands aren't as narrowly niche-fied as that: All Systems Fail is described as "vintage kettlebell hardcore," Bancho brings electro-pop with fruit on the menu, Cady Heron identifies as "cool mom-core/powerviolence," Sympathy Pain slows things down with ambient/drone, and Hylian is post hardcore/pop-punk. The event also includes art, a raffle and treats. Donations support the chapter's participation in a national conference in October. (Brian Staker) Diabolical Records, 238 S. Edison St., 8 p.m., $5 suggested donation,


FRIDAY 9. 30 & SATURDAY 10.1
Colt .46

Ogden-based country band Colt .46 had a great year, winning Best Country Act in City Weekly's Best of Utah Music 2016 and releasing their debut album, Hang Fire. Now they're working on an EP, which frontman Dale Condie says should "hopefully be released in the first part of next year." The band will also make an appearance on Comcast Entertainment Television's local music program Studio Sessions this fall. This is all especially exciting, since the band purveys a type of country music that's rare these days. They don't subscribe to the Nashville pop-country model or try too hard to be hipster and "alt-country." They cover universal themes, alienating no one without compromising their sound. (Randy Harward) The Westerner, 3360 S. Redwood, 9 p.m., $5 (ladies' night),


Dinosaur Jr., Steve Gunn, Residual Kid

One of alternative rock's greatest bands, Ohio's Dinosaur Jr. should be bigger and, I dunno, more famouser (copy edit on Aisle 5!). But, considering the band's—and especially co-frontman/songwriter/guitar wizard J. Mascis'—slacker image, maybe we should just be happy they're still around. Whereas many bands run out of juice after 10 years together, Dinosaur Jr.—after almost a quarter-century together (not counting their eight years apart)—has kept putting out strong albums since reuniting in 2005. That'd be true to form for a bunch of ostensible lay-abouts, doing just enough to get by with solid C+ Metacritic average. Except, when you see the trio live, with Mascis both playing and looking like a (nerdy, stoned) wizard, and singing in his glorious signature whine-snore, with bassist Lou Barlow and drummer Murph propelling the band's brand of loud-quiet-loud, you see that there's some real work behind the music. They're just so good at what they do, that it seems otherwise. Could that be why they're calling their latest album for Jagjaguwar Give a Glimpse of What Yer Not? (Randy Harward) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 7:30 p.m., $25 advance/$30 day of,


Neil Young & Promise of the Real

With the possible exception of Bob Dylan, Neil Young is arguably the world's greatest living folk rocker. But he's so much more. Young is often spoken of in similar terms as Dylan: a voice that's eccentrically emotive, but for some is like nails on chalkboard; a prolific and widely varied body of work; and an uncompromising dedication to his music. In some ways, the 70-year old Toronto, Canada, native has remained more contemporary. In recent years, he's become more politically active, especially in environmental causes, and his latest album, the live disc Earth (Reprise, 2016) includes the title track from last year's stinging The Monsanto Years as well as a few old chestnuts like "After the Gold Rush" and "Human Highway." A chance to witness a legend encapsulate such a career (with Willie Nelson offspring in backup band Promise of the Real, no less) doesn't come along often. (BS) Usana Amphitheatre, 5150 S. 6055 West, 8 p.m., $36-$125,


Brian Wilson

Former Beach Boy Brian Wilson is on tour, performing an album he produced and released a half century ago. Though Pet Sounds was a commercial disappointment upon its 1966 release, it's now recognized as a landmark album, encompassing classics like "Wouldn't It Be Nice" and "God Only Knows," along with eleven other tracks. And it's effectively a Wilson solo project, stemming from his creative vision: "I had in my mind exactly what I wanted when I got to the studio," he says in a recent interview with Pittsburgh City Paper. "I told the musicians what to play." Wilson is often visibly uncomfortable on stage, but his stellar ensemble—featuring former Beach Boys Al Jardine and Blondie Chaplin—puts on a peerless show that includes Pet Sounds in its entirety, plus other Beach Boys favorites. The Pet Sounds tour is at least as much a show for Brian Wilson as it is by him—but the man has earned it. (Bill Kopp) Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $45-$125, ages 8+,


Tengger Cavalry, Incite
The ancient Mongols—the people of the notorious emperor Genghis Khan—were metal before metal existed. They're said to have been cannibals (albeit only occasionally, compared to some other accounts), killing one in 10 soldiers to ensure the other nine had happy tummies. Sometimes they'd even open their horses' throats and drink deeply. New York City "nomadic folk metal" quintet Tengger Cavalry adopted the look, but not the diet. They don't even fake it for the show. Instead, they express their brutality through epic heavy metal with guttural and shrieky vox, austere riffs and rhythms just begging to drive an army into battle. All this, with embellishments like traditional folk instrumentation—like the Mongolian flute and the extra-metal horse-head fiddle—and throat singing, which sounds extra badass. Phoenix groove-metal outfit Incite opens. (RH) Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $15 adv./$18 day of, 21+,


GRiZ, Haywyre, Louis Futon
Detroit-based electronic musician GRiZ calls his latest album Good Will Prevail (All Good Records). Evidently, he means it. He gives away tons of his music on and raises money for Little Kids Rock. And his Salt Lake City appearance is one of several shows happening in SLC leading up to the presidential election, where GRiZ and artists like Okkervil River, Ani DiFranco and Bad Religion partner with the non-partisan voter registration organization Headcount and HelloVote, a company that enables registration via text or Facebook Messenger. On top of that, the man invented a new strain of weed (GRiZ Kush) that won the People's Choice Award at the 2015 High Times Cannabis Cup. He truly is a man of the people. GRiZ 2016! (RH) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m., $25 in advance, $30 day of show,

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