LIVE: Music Picks Sept. 15-21 

Garbage, Blues Brothers Revue, Cyndi Lauper and more

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Garbage, Cigarettes After Sex

Not only have '90s alt-rock darlings Garbage returned; City Weekly hears that drummer/producer/co-founder Butch Vig has been cleared to rejoin the band after staying off the road due to doctor's orders. Now, one might argue that all you need from Garbage is hot Scot Shirley Manson and her sultry vox. Granted, she's the show—but she was also the last to join the band. Vig—who produced Nirvana's Nevermind, along with Steve Marker and Duke Erikson—started the group, and while a drummer can be replaced, a founder/producer cannot. The band's sixth album, Strange Little Things (Stunvolume), shows the quartet as a whole still has the heady, atmospheric goods they showed off on their eponymous 1995 debut. (Randy Harward) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7:30 p.m. (doors), $35 in advance (plus fees),


The Official Blues Brothers Revue

This takes the franchising of bands to another level. This "official revue" version of the legendary Chicago jump blues band—originally fronted by the late, great John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd as Jake and Elwood Blues, respectively—is a tribute staffed with lookalikes Wayne Catania and Kieron Lafferty in the roles. Aykroyd and John's brother Jim still gig as Jake and Zee (Elwood's brother) in a version called "The Legacy and the Blood," and the original Blues Brothers band, featuring cats like guitarist Steve Cropper and sax man Lou Marini—but different members on everything else, including vocals—is also still around. But if you like Hell's Belles, Irony Man, Zoso and other tribute acts that endeavor to recreate the original experience, you won't be disappointed tonight. You might say these fellas are on a mission from God. (RH) Utah State Fairpark, 155 N. 1000 West, 8 p.m., free with fair admission (seating ticket required),


Death Valley Girls, Babewatch, Hot Vodka

Genre names are increasingly meaningless, so when a band cheekily tries to give itself a new one, it can be pretty entertaining. Take, for example, these tags that Los Angeles-based Burger Records recording artists Death Valley Girls threw up on their Facebook page: "Rock 'n' roll, dystopian punk, doom boogie, occult glam." That first one's pretty out-there, eh? The other three are like well-written restaurant menu copy: If a record store clerk read that to you like they were the daily specials, you'd be salivating like Pavlov's dog hearing the dinner bell. Now go to and listen to the two tracks posted there. But first, put on a bib, before you drown in your own slobber and the band's copious reverb. (Randy Harward) Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 7 p.m., $10,


Badfeather album release w/ DJ Logic

City Weekly is privileged to have early mixes of most of Signal Path, the debut album by local rock/funk/soul band, Badfeather. It's not like we don't have a digital listening stack that's gigs deep, but it's hard not to let it play all day long. Hell, I defy anyone who loves a fat, funky groove not to repeat the live favorite "Sweat." In fact, it's hard to stay focused on the rest of these blurbs. I've already written the treatment for an "erotic short film" for the track (open casting call next Tuesday at the LDS Temple Visitors Center). But when I force myself to get past it, it's total goodness, including more favorites, like "Babbling Riverside Blues" which recalls the Doobie Brothers' sublime "Black Water." Many of the tunes dwell in this Doobies-Wilco-Steely Dan wonderland, except for the balls-out blues-rocker, "Moxia," which smacks of The Black Keys. Already full of quite pleasant surprises, Signal Path—engineered and produced by Dave Aron (Sublime, Snoop Dogg, locals Grits Green)—is shaping up to be one of my favorite local releases this year. You've got two shots to catch Badfeather's release party—with none other than DJ Logic sitting in and compounding the grooves before and between Badfeather's sets. Take 'em both. (RH) The Cabin, 825 Main, Park City, Friday, 9 p.m., $5, 21+,; The State Room, 638 S. State, Saturday, 9 p.m., $12, 21+,


Cyndi Lauper, Charlie Musselwhite

You know, Cyndi Lauper's pretty much a punk-ish Dolly Parton, sans them epic ... attributes. She's petite, adorable and takes no shit. She's also full of surprises. For one, she played the dulcimer in the singer-songwriter supergroup Largo in the late '90s, she put out a blues album (Memphis Blues, 2010), and her new album Detour (Sire) is—gasp!country. Lauper's signature squeak and retro-glam vibe make twangy chestnuts like "Heartaches by the Number" and "Walkin' After Midnight" her own, but still surprisingly faithful to the original versions. Not even when she busts out the fiddles and the cameos from Willie Nelson, Emmylou Harris, Vince Gill, Alison Krauss and, uh, Jewel—and even dials back the squeal—the album is undeniably Cyndi Lauper. That goes to show what many have known for decades: She's much more than a silly girl who just wants to have fun. With a blues harp legend Musselwhite opening, expect to hear a few numbers from Memphis Blues sprinkled into the set. (RH) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $51 in advance, $56 day of show,


Echo & the Bunnymen

Wanna learn some Cockney rhyming slang? I'll share a term I just learned, myself. According to Wikipedia—the most inaccessible and accurate research tool (trust no other!) available to esteemed rock-write guys such as myself—when Echo & the Bunnymen decided to continue with Noel Burke replacing singer Ian McCulloch, well, that didn't go over well with fans and, of course, McCulloch. The original Bunnymen vocalist, reflecting on this, says Burke's name said it all. He refers to the similarity between the scab singer's surname and "berk"—short for "Berkshire hunt," which rhymes with a very naughty word. Anyway, vocab lesson over. Now let's get all fangirly about one of the best new wave/post-punk bands of the '80s coming to our neck o' the woods. In a year that has seen similar acts like The Church, Psychedelic Furs and Peter Murphy come to town, it's really the icing on the cake. They'd better play "People Are Strange," though—otherwise I'm gonna demonstrate my newly acquired vocabulary for McCulloch and mates. (RH) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $31 in advance, $35 day of show,


Molotov, La Calavera
So remember all the hubbub about Portland stoner rockers Black Pussy's name, and how feminists were boycotting it because it would somehow encourage rape? Something similar happened to Mexican rap-rockers Molotov. Shockingly, despite the song not being about gay people at all—not to mention the long-running band's well-deserved status as Mexico's musical and political equivalent of Rage Against the Machine—their track "Puto" drew the ire of GLAAD. Obviously, it was for its use of the word "puto," which most of us know as a derogatory term for homosexual. ¡Qué mierda! However, Molotov departs from Rage in that, while they use their music as a platform for serious ideas, they also bring the party with a wicked sense of humor. Imagine if Cyco Miko from Suicidal Tendencies, but wearing his goofier Infectious Grooves bandana, joined Rage and you have an idea of the sort of unbridled rap-rock Molotov plays—and how much fun this stop on Molotov's Chinga Tour Madre 2016 will be. Local rock en español masters La Calavera open. (RH) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m., $30 in advance, $35 day of show,

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