Live: Music Picks July 7-13 

David Liebe Hart, Neko Case, k.d. lang and Laura Veirs and more

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THURSDAY 7.7
David Liebe Hart

The bizarre world of "outsider" music isn't for everyone. While the music is earnest, it's not exactly accessible—at first. You have to push your weirdness tolerance threshold back a couple of miles, and just dig it for what it is. Case in point: David Liebe Hart, who you may recognize from Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job! and other T&E productions. He's the guy with the puppets who sings about aliens, eating your veggies, God and, much like alpha-outsider Daniel Johnston, his inability to find someone special. On this tour, DLH—accompanied by his puppets with a video backdrop—performs songs from his ever-growing discography, including his latest, Astronaut (ArtByLiebeHart.com, 2015). If you're already savvy, you're already goin'. If you're unfamiliar, take a gamble on David Liebe Hart. It'll pay off big time. Fellow T&E alum Palmer Scott is along for the ride, as are local bands Big Baby and '90s Television. (Randy Harward) Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 7 p.m., $10 in advance, $12 day of show, KilbyCourt.com

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FRIDAY 7.8
Case/Lang/Veirs

Neko Case, k.d. lang and Laura Veirs: Who could see such a singer-songwriter supergroup coming, or imagine how they'd sound? Case exists in the alt-country/rock realm, lang dwells in her own country-jazz-pop limbo, and Veirs inhabits the stable of an indie-folk dark horse, captive in the awareness of hipster music journos. While there is sufficient common ground between the friends' music, it's tough to conceptualize the sum of their sounds. Would the album be a three-way split of songs written and sung by one of the women while the other two back her up? They're all established artists in their own right, and headliners—so that would seem likely. But it's not the case (eeeeeeewwww—unintentional). case/lang/veirs (Anti-) is the work of a band. The chemistry of these friends is so immediate, and their respect for each other so clear, as they work together on each other's songs, creating sublime harmonies and trading vocal turns on songs that blend their respective styles of each without a hint of ego. As with their solo work, the songs are intimate and easy to connect to—maybe even moreso, with their individual and collective powers at work. Their debut LP is easily one of the best albums of 2016. Since Red Butte shows tend to sell out so fast, it's a wonder tickets are still available for this one. Chamber-pop band Loch Lomond opens. (RH) Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, 7:30 p.m., $54-$59, RedButteGarden.org

Marissa Nadler
When she broke out in 2007 with her Kemado Records debut, Songs III: Bird on the Water (her third album overall), Massachusetts-bred Marissa Nadler bewitched the world with her hauntingly mellifluous vocals and cerebral, intoxicating songs. Over her next four albums (and a mess of EPs, demo and covers collections), Nadler proved to be what she sounds like: a splice of Kate Bush and Joni Mitchell. Her newest album, Strangers (Sacred Bones/Bella Union, 2016) is no less striking than her other work—in fact, the dazed ache her music evokes is even stronger. Noise-metal collective Wrekmeister Harmonies and experimental duo Muscle and Marrow open, providing a dissonant, though no less hypnotic, counterpoint. (RH) Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 7 p.m., $12, KilbyCourt.com

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SATURDAY 7.9
The B-52s with the Utah Symphony

Always a guaranteed great time, The B-52s, are still rockin' lobsters and lovin' in shacks (with rusty tin roofs) after 40 years together. The Athens, Ga., band's music is pure aural pleasure, a stream-of-consciousness party in yo' pants. So how does it sound with a symphonic accompaniment? What does it add to the music? Does it elevate the compositions to some higher level of artistry? Or is it lame, pretentious, bandwagon-esque and the mark of a band so bored with their own material that they need to do, I dunno, something different? One could argue convincingly for and against all of the above. And you might think a sober, serious symphony orchestra would be a wet beach blanket at a B-52s show, turning it into a veritable Channel Zzzzzzz. But YouTube clips of the group performing "Roam" and "Private Idaho" with the Nashville Symphony earlier this year show that the tunes are front-and-center, their energy intact, while the orchestra is largely unobtrusive (if ultimately superfluous). Then again, what on this planet, or even "Planet Claire," could possibly derail this relentless party machine? (RH) Deer Valley Resort's Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater, 2250 S. Deer Valley Drive, Park City, 7:30 p.m., $49-$120, DeerValley.com

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Bear Fest 2016: Bret Michaels, Ratt, Dokken, Lita Ford, Warrant
As in the '80s and '90s, KBER's Bear Fest remains a gathering of hirsute men cheering for other hairy dudes—and many women demonstrating their appreciation of the same group in mammary flashes. Well, things are different now. The hair farmers have harvested their last crops, either because they're older and wiser or because their follicular landscape was poisoned by excessive Aqua Net crop-dustings (or genetics). In 2016, we have computers in our pockets and Poison singer Bret Michaels has hair plugs, a butcher-than-Poison backing band and an ostensible desire to be a country artist. Ratt is a band of scabs—including a baby-faced new singer—surrounding original drummer Bobby Blotzer. Dokken is missing its guitar hero George Lynch (who's working with local producer Joe Haze on a new band, Uni-Mog) and another key member in Jeff Pilson. Warrant is all original except for long-time replacement vocalist Robert Mason, who's a good but not great substitute for late original singer Jani Lane. The good news is that Lita Ford is still Lita Ford—and the songs these bands made famous in their heyday sound as good as ever—nay, awesome—after quaffing enough $10 tall cans of domestic pisswater. Plus, tonight's not about the future, anyway. (RH) Usana Amphitheatre, 5150 S. 6055 West, 4 p.m., $30-$66, Usana-Amp.com

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FRIDAY 7.8
The Bad Kids Collective: One-Year Anniversary of Weirdo

For the past year, the Bad Kids Collective has staged a monthly event that aims to reclaim the word "weirdo" for everyone who's ever felt like an outcast—the LGBTQ crowd, in particular. "At Weirdo," the collective says on its Facebook page, "we celebrate the beautiful oddities in life through vibrant self-expression with performances, dance music and a colorful queer crowd ... welcoming all walks of life and unifying those who choose to partake in the shenanigans!" Tonight, they celebrate the endurance of their inclusive dance party with music by DJDC, drag performances by members of their troupe, art installations and—IhopeIhopeIhope—the cyclopean cupcakes pictured on the fliers. RSVP on Facebook to get free admission before 10:30 p.m. (Randy Harward) Area 51, 451 S. 400 West, 10 p.m., $5 (21+), $7 (18+), Facebook.com/BadKidsSLC

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SUNDAY 7.10
Dragged Into Sunlight, Cult Leader, Primitive Man

U.K. extreme metal merchants Dragged Into Sunlight eschew light—especially the spotlight—so much that they often play with their backs to the crowd, and with minimal stage lighting. This—and the candles on stage—adds a sinister edge to their music, which variously ventures from doom/sludge into black/death metal and detours into crust. The latter is also the domain of local openers Cult Leader, who are sandwiched between DiS and self-described "death-sludge/funeral punk" band Primitive Man, out of Denver. Locals Portal to the God Damn Blood Dimension and Moon of Delirium also appear. (RH) Metro Bar, 615 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $12, JRCSLC.com

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