Inacting Change 

If you could change one thing in The Salt Lake Tribune or the Deseret News, what would it be?

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If you could change one thing in The Salt Lake Tribune or the Deseret News, what would it be?

Susan Kruithof: Change your mindset. Print is still king. City Weekly’s pick up rate has never been stronger in the 14 years I’ve been working here. Stop firing, start hiring. Your product is your people. Without them, you have nothing worth reading.

Paula Saltas: I’d like both of them to be more absorbent—neither one sops up a spilled mojito very well.

Eric Peterson: The problem isn’t what to change, it’s how to pay for it. But since we’re just talking about what to change and not how to do it, the answer is simple—more resources for investigative reporting. Shrinking newsrooms mean that beat reporters are stretched too thin just keeping up with press conferences, reports and official meetings. Papers need more special projects so that reporters can dig into a handful of big projects a year instead of being expected to crank out a dozen stories a week. The more watchdog reporting that happens, the more problems that will be uncovered and addressed by society at large before they hemorrhage into problems that seem too intractable to solve.

Kolbie Stonehocker: It would be so cool if an issue of The Salt Lake Tribune had an elaborate secret code embedded in it that led the reader to a buried treasure or a time capsule.

Paydn Augustine: Have them both annexed by City Weekly, the only true paper in Salt Lake.

Colin Wolf: It would be appropriate if the paper that the Deseret News used to print on resembled golden plates and you needed a special decoder stone to read the articles.

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