citylog
The E-
Edition:
CW
page
by page

Tumblr.jpg Google_Plus.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biomimicry

The pliability of clay makes it naturally lend itself to organic forms; not just human representations, but also flora and fauna. Currently, Art Access is hosting a show by nonprofit group Clay Arts Utah that demonstrates just how flexible the ceramic form can be.

The show is curated by Heidi Moller Somsen, herself an accomplished local sculptor. The surfaces of Nolan Baumgartner’s bowls and vases undulate under their glazes. On the more extreme side, Dan Vu’s “Pfiesteria” is either a many-armed blue-speckled spherical organism%u2028held aloft, or a round-bodied blue fern, with fronds extending in all directions. William James’ squid vase (pictured) appears to be in the middle of transforming itself into the tentacled creature.

Clay is one form of the earth from which all life emerges, and taking on the form of living things in the figurative sense is a powerful use of the medium. Biomimicry is showing concurrently with Westish, an exhibit of animation and screen prints by Ryan Perkins. (Brian Staker)


Date: Apr 8, 2013
Time:
Phone: 801-328-0703
Address: 230 S. 500 West, Salt Lake City, 84101
Where: Art Access Gallery
 
 
 
Close
Close
Close