Door-to-door Singing | 5 Spot | Salt Lake City | Salt Lake City Weekly

Door-to-door Singing 

Pin It
Favorite
news_fivespot1-1-0d6eabdcd85373b5.jpg

Instead of just another political campaigner, salesperson or missionary knocking at your door, imagine it is Derk Boss, a Salt Lake City troubadour with a master's degree in poetry and a guitar, serenading you and making you his latest audience of one.

How did you get into music?
I suffered from insomnia as a teen and my dad introduced me to Moody Blues and Elton John. I would listen to "Nights in White Satin" and "Belfast" on tape to fall asleep. Music made such an impact on my life, so I saved up from my part-time job, bought a guitar, took lessons and practiced two hours a day.

How did you come up with door-to-door singing?
I've been writing music for a long time and wanted to do it full-time, but I needed a way to break in. I had done door-to-door sales in Oregon in 2011, so I knew how to canvass. That morphed into selling music door-to-door with these one-song private concerts. People say you can't make a living from it. A lot of very good musicians can't make it work, but I'm just willing to do whatever it takes. My tenacity sometimes even surprises me. When I play for people, it really shocks them. They are like, 'Wow, why aren't you already ...?'

Like Billy Joel's lyrics in "Piano Man," asking, "Man, what are you doing here?"
I feel like that—like I am on the verge of really big things. It's just a matter of keeping going. The lead singer of Panic! at the Disco was born in St. George and worked in a fast-food restaurant singing for people. He put himself out there.

How do people find you?
Facebook and YouTube.

With a master's degree in poetry, why give up teaching college English ?
I didn't feel I was following my calling. My father, who was my biggest fan, passed way from prostate cancer in 2008. I had brought my guitar to sing songs to him I had written. [One of] the last things I remember him saying was, 'You know, it's fine that you are getting your degree in English, but you really could have made a career in music if you had decided to do that.' And the way that he said it was like I still could. And that has just replayed in my head a lot. And when I was teaching at [Southern Utah University], I kept thinking of that like I really think he was right. A lot of people I've met have had parents who were not as supportive of their music. I just feel really fortunate that my parents gave me that extra confidence that this is what I should be doing.

Pin It
Favorite

Tags:

About The Author

Stan Rosenzweig

More by Stan Rosenzweig

  • Homelessness Continues

    >News editors sometimes make a fundamental error when reporting on the drug-addicted and the homeless, treating the two as if they are one and the same.
    • Feb 22, 2017
  • Q&A with Noor Ul-Hasan

    Muslim leader and community activist
    • Feb 22, 2017
  • Q&A with Addison Odom

    Addison Odom's first career as a photographer-writer morphed into teaching high school visual arts in Memphis, Tenn., and now she helps save the world here in Utah through wilderness therapy after a brief stint as an organic farmer.
    • Feb 15, 2017
  • More »

Latest in 5 Spot

  • Q&A with Noor Ul-Hasan

    Muslim leader and community activist
    • Feb 22, 2017
  • Q&A with Addison Odom

    Addison Odom's first career as a photographer-writer morphed into teaching high school visual arts in Memphis, Tenn., and now she helps save the world here in Utah through wilderness therapy after a brief stint as an organic farmer.
    • Feb 15, 2017
  • LGBTQ-rights pioneer Cleve Jones on the new frontier of gay rights

    Breakthroughs for LGBTQ rights wouldn't be possible without those who put themselves on the line, such as author and activist Cleve Jones.
    • Feb 8, 2017
  • More »

Comments (5)

Showing 1-5 of 5

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-5 of 5

Add a comment

Readers also liked…

  • Utah Guitarist Jamie Glaser

    Guitarist Jamie Glaser has worked on TV shows such as Seinfeld, Married With Children, Saved by the Bell and others.
    • Dec 23, 2015
  • Q&A with art activist Cat Palmer

    Local photographer fights to Keep the Politicians Out of Our Vagina with powerful photo series.
    • Dec 21, 2016

© 2017 Salt Lake City Weekly

Website powered by Foundation