Beck Untainted 

As a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and as a listener of Glenn Beck, I would like to comment on “Latter-day Taint” [Dec. 10, City Weekly]. Glenn Beck is not a taint, but rather, a shining example of what a good man ought to be. He completely turned his life around after a hellish struggle with drug and alcohol abuse and has striven to become a better man ever since.

His conversion to Mormonism had nothing to do with politics. It was an admonition to boldly and honestly question everything that led him to join the church. The teachings of the church simply made sense to him. In addition, he witnessed an attitude of sincerity among the members. Watch Glenn Beck: An Unlikely Mormon to hear his story in his own words.

There is no “brand” of Mormonism.

The church teaches only one gospel and encourages its members to abide by it. There are, however, members who abandon gospel principles for wealth, power, prestige and popularity. Wouldn’t it be flakey for the church to do the same in response to cultural pressure?

Beck does not claim that government is the agent of Satan. Section 134 of Doctrine and Covenants, canonized LDS Scripture, explains very clearly that government is for our benefit so long as it fulfills its duty to secure and promote the freedom of the people. A corrupt and abusive government, e.g., one that is communist, is evil, however.

Beck gets under the politicians’ skin because he is completely nonpartisan while undauntedly exposing how corrupt they are. Anyone who honestly questions the issues like he has will surely come to recognize the same things.

Brandon Brown
Woods Cross

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