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Home / Articles / Guides / Outdoor Recreation Guide /  Boon Camp-anions
Outdoor Recreation Guide

Boon Camp-anions

Finding the perfect campsite for you and the ones you love.

By Jessica Dunn
Posted // May 24,2013 -

When you’re living in a valley cradled by the Wasatch and Oquirrh mountains, the wilderness is almost literally in your backyard. With the Great Salt Lake to the north, the Uinta high wilderness to the east, the gear-head playground of the Bonneville Salt Flats to the west, and vast Utah deserts and four national parks to the south, there’s no excuse not to pack the car for a camping trip with family, friends, your significant other, Fido or just yourself.

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Families are Forever
Spruces Campground, Big Cottonwood Canyon
Sometimes, the best family vacations are those that don’t include the question, “Are we there yet?” Spruces Campground is a mere 9.7 miles up Big Cottonwood Canyon and is one of the best places to get out of the mid-summer heat. Some campsites are nestled in tree groves, others along the stream. Paved walks, restrooms and camp grills help the great outdoors seem a little more convenient. Take the kids on a hike to nearby Donut Falls, or to Solitude for a round of disc golf. But make sure to reserve a site at least five days ahead of time, especially for busy holiday weekends. Big Cottonwood Canyon, Salt Lake City, 877-444-6777

Friendly Fire
Big Bend Campground, Moab
If you’re new to the Moab camping scene or bringing along friends who aren’t used to roughing it in your favorite primitive spot, Big Bend and the surrounding campgrounds on the banks of the Colorado River are prime spots to camp with a group. You can float the Moab Daily, a 13-mile, Class III section of the Colorado, and pass right by your campsite. There are lots of other activities to occupy your camping crew as well, including climbing, mountain biking, and hiking in Arches National Park. Highway 128, Moab, 435-259-2102

Honeymoon Central
King Creek Campground, Dixie National Forest
Camping anywhere with your lover is the stuff of honeymoons, but doesn’t a campground located down a secluded dirt road next to a tropical reservoir sound especially heavenly? King Creek campground, next to Tropic Reservoir, is typically pretty empty. The campground sits in a forest of pine trees about nine miles west of Bryce Canyon. You can make a day trip to Bryce to join the masses, or venture to more private hoodoos via two trails right out of the campground—Chimney Rock and King Creek. Tropic Reservoir is a great place to cool off and paddle around at the end of the day. East Fork Road 87 near Bryce Canyon City, 435-676-2676

Tails & Trails
Weber Memorial Park, Weber County
Nestled along the south fork of the Ogden River—above Huntsville—Weber Memorial Park has more than 60 shaded camping and picnic sites. Your furry friend will love romping in the river shallows, and just a few miles up the road is Causey Reservoir, one of the most scenic reservoirs in Utah. You and your pet can paddle, kayak and jump off cliffs together before heading back for a night around the campfire.Off of Causey Drive in Huntsville, 801-625-3850

Solo Level 1
Mirror Lake Campground, Wasatch National Forest
When it’s time to spread your wings and fly solo out of town, away from your boss or your friends’ drama, you really don’t have to go far to get away from it all. Seventy-five miles outside of Salt Lake City is a majestic lake high in the Wasatch National Forest. Mirror Lake and its campground are a perfect base camp for a completely relaxing weekend alone. Bring a book and lounge in a hammock, or enjoy one of the 20 trailheads in close proximity, as well as fishing spots, scenic overlooks and ATV trails. Off of Highway 150, 30 miles east of Kanab, 435-783-4338

Solo Level 2
Highline Trail, Uinta Mountains
The time will eventually come when you’re ready to embark on your spirit quest. You yearn for inner peace and the discovery of your true self. If you’ve reached the level of outdoorsmanship where you can easily channel your inner Bear Grylls, hit the Highline Trail in the Uintas. This 78-mile trail crosses eight major passes and rarely dips below the timberline. Camp in high alpine meadows and bag the highest peak in Utah—Kings Peak, at 13,528 feet. You’ll want to plan at least seven days for the full trail, so do your research and get out there! Forest Service Road 43 near Vernal, 435-789-1181

 
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